Newsletter - October 2022 - Grammar Error Hunts

Mary Cullen
Post by Mary Cullen
Originally published October 26, 2022, updated October 28, 2022

Writing for Business Newsletter

Expert tips and strategies to enhance your writing at work
October 2022 Issue

 

How many times have you hit "send" on an email just to see an embarrassing grammar error a second too late? Or maybe you've actually received negative feedback on your spelling or grammar in the past?

Grammar and proofreading are common struggles for many professionals, and the rules that apply to each are not only complicated but can change over time. 

As a fun throwback to our elementary school days, we've created five error hunt exercises below that reflect the most common mistakes we see in business writing.

Can you spot the errors below?

  1. Can we reschedule our training? Our team is open anytime in January, if there is a particular time that will work best for you, let me know.

  2. Looking forward to working with you.

  3. The president sent letters to Lauren and I.

  4. We need a short term solution to our sales reporting issues.

  5. Let’s bring in a consultant to analyze the Acme proposal and assess it's worth.

Here are the corrections with links to full explanations about each grammar rule:

  1. Can we reschedule our training? Our team is open anytime in January. If there is a particular time that will work best for you, let me know.

    The original statement above contains a run-on or fused sentence and needed a period to break up the sentence into two. This is one of the most common errors we see in business writing. We wrote this great resource to help you understand and fix these sentence structure mistakes when you see them. 

  2. I'm looking forward to working with you.

    While it's incredibly common to end an email, this is actually a sentence fragment and is incorrect as it's missing its subject. Here is another explanation of how to avoid these common sentence-related errors.


  3. The president sent letters to Lauren and me.

    Me, myself, and I are commonly misused, but once you understand the differences between each, you should never make this mistake again.

  4. We need a short-term solution to our sales reporting issues.

    Hyphens are very complicated punctuation marks and therefore very easy to mess up. We outlined how to best use hyphens along with a funny example in this blog article.


  5. Let’s bring in a consultant to analyze the Acme proposal and assess its worth.

    You definitely won't be alone if you missed this one. We recently updated this article which provides a helpful trick to remember the proper usage, distinct differences, and correct spelling of it's and its.


If you made more mistakes than you'd like to admit or it took a second to find the solutions, our online self-paced Proofreading & Grammar Course may be a great option.

This course not only teaches the most up-to-date grammar rules that are relevant to business writing but is full of practice opportunities and instructor interaction to ensure you create error-free documents every time.

You can enroll now and improve your grammar skills right away.

 

More recent blog articles

English Grammar 101

by Katie Almeida Spencer

5 Steps to Write a Technical Proposal

by Elisabeth O'Quinn

11 Grammar Exercises for Business English

by Grace Cuddy

Guide to Strong Policy Writing

by Elisabeth O'Quinn

Incorrect writing can reflect poorly on your performance.

Don't let your expertise be shadowed by poor or inefficient writing. Maintain your professionalism and reputation by ensuring that documents and emails are correct, clear, and concise every time.

Let's talk about your goals and see if we can help you meet them.


 
Instructional Solutions helps groups and individuals at every level master the critical skill of business writing.

Courses  |  Coaching  |  Learning Center

Learn More About:

Business Email | Business Grammar | Executive Summary Writing
Proposal Writing | Sales Writing | Technical Report Writing 

 

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Newsletter
Mary Cullen
Post by Mary Cullen
Originally published October 26, 2022, updated October 28, 2022
Mary founded Instructional Solutions in 1998, and is an internationally recognized business writing trainer and executive writing coach with two decades of experience helping thousands of individuals and businesses master the strategic skill of business writing. She excels at designing customized business writing training programs to maximize productivity, advance business objectives, and convey complex information. She holds a B.A. in English from the University of Rhode Island, an M.A. in English Literature from Boston College, and a C.A.G.S. in Composition and Rhetoric from the University of New Hampshire.

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